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Your Brain Matters

Your Brain

There are more than 900,000 Australians currently living with dementia and there is something you can do to reduce your risk. Scientific evidence tells us that certain lifestyle and health behaviours, particularly around midlife, are associated with reduced risk of developing dementia in late life. So, look after your brain health to reduce your risk of dementia. It’s never too early or late to start, as brain health can be improved and protected at any age.

Middle-aged Australians need to treat their brain health like they do their superannuation to avoid the risk of dementia, says a leading expert. – Protect your brain health – SBS 11 April 2018

The Australian Brain Foundation – www.brainfoundation.org.au/healthy-brain

The Healthy Brain Program, an initiative of the Brain Foundation, aims to assist Australians to keep their brains healthy into old age, through the provision of community education and research.

Your Brain Matters www.yourbrainmatters.org.au

Research suggests certain lifestyle and health factors are good for the brain, body and heart and can help reduce the risk of developing dementia.

Five Simple Steps to Maximise Your Brain Health is an important component of Alzheimer’s Australia’s dementia risk reduction program, Your Brain Matters, and emphasises how preventive health measures can benefit your brain health.

It is never too late to switch to a healthier lifestyle. You don’t need to start doing expensive new brain-training programs either – although they may be helpful – much of what you need to do to enjoy good brain health are simple things that you can easily do in your everyday life to lower your risk of dementia.

Step One – Look after your heart

Step Two – Be physically active

Step Three – Mentally challenge your brain

Step Four – Follow a healthy diet

Step Five – Enjoy social activity

 

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